Blossom the turkey and Minnow the dog have something in common — they were both once thought of only as “food.” Minnow was rescued from a South Korean meat farm in 2015, and Blossom was saved last year from a commercial turkey farm in West Virginia. Today they share a home with Abbie Hubbard, and are like any other family. They go on hikes together, snuggle on the sofa and greet Abbie at the door. “When I put the keys in, I hear Blossom make loud chirping sounds in excitement,” Abbie, who is the Animal Rescue Responder for Humane Society International, tells LAIKA. “She always comes running, and it makes my heart do flips of joy.”

Blossom (left) and Minnow out on a walk. Photo: Abbie Hubbard.

Abbie recalls once being asked by a reporter in South Korea what it was like to have a dog that was different from other ‘meat’ dogs. She explained that Minnow is no different, and that her heart is the same as all other dogs. “I often think about that question in regards to Blossom,” she says. “My response would be that she, too, is no different — her heart is the same as all other beings.”

While Abbie was already vegan when Blossom came to live with her and her dog Minnow, it was through Blossom that she gained a deeper understanding of turkeys — starting with the very first night she took her home. “Blossom watched as I pet Minnow and seemed to recognize that I was a source of kindness and was a safe being,” Abbie says. “Shortly after, Blossom came and settled into the crook of my arm. It’s hard to describe that moment without crying. I’ll never forget it as long as I live.”

Blossom with one of her favorite toys. Photo: Abbie Hubbard.

Among the many things that Blossom enjoys is hearing a good beat. Abbie says that “if she is in another room and I turn on music, she comes running!” Her very favorite food is hummus, and her second favorite is watermelon. She loves hanging out in the kitchen when Abbie is cooking. She relishes a good head scratch and will rest her head in Abbie’s hand to receive cuddles. “She allows herself to be vulnerable with me, and I always recognize those moments,” says Abbie. “It feels like such an honor, especially knowing what people do to turkeys and other farmed animals.”

“That my dog Minnow has been deemed a companion by our society and my turkey Blossom has been deemed food is completely arbitrary.”

Every year, 46 million turkeys are slaughtered for Thanksgiving, and another 200 million throughout the year. Killed at barely four months old and not protected by the Humane Slaughter Act, their lives are short and agonizing. Abbie has witnessed how easily Blossom gets frightened in the safety of her home, whether it’s by the doorbell, loud noises outside or even the soundtrack of a scary movie (This past Halloween, she got spooked when Abbie was watching Poltergeist and hid in the living room. “I turned the film off and went to comfort her,” Abbie says.) These moments offer a small glimpse into how terrifying daily life must be for turkeys on farms. In fact, it was this fear of danger that led to Blossom being rescued from that West Virginia facility. When the five-week-old turkeys were being moved to a “grow out house” to be fattened up for slaughter, she hid for days behind a piece of equipment. A farm worker who discovered her decided to mercifully surrender her to a local rescue.

Minnow and Blossom. Photo: Abbie Hubbard.

These days, Blossom and Minnow are deeply connected. Because she is 30 pounds and can’t get up the stairs (turkeys are bred to grow unnaturally large quickly), Blossom sleeps downstairs. And Minnow stays right there by her side, keeping her company through the night. “That my dog Minnow has been deemed a companion by our society and my turkey Blossom has been deemed food is completely arbitrary,” Abbie says. “Blossom has the same depth and range of feeling. She bonds with others. She plays. She doesn’t like being alone. She hurts and she loves. Blossom is completely and entirely my companion for the same reasons Minnow is my companion.”

There’s no need to uphold traditions that don’t reflect our inherent values of love, compassion and respect. We asked Tere Fox, co-founder and executive chef of the famed NYC restaurant-turned-catering-company Rockin’ Raw, to share the recipes for two of her most beloved dishes. These mouth-watering King Trumpet Vegan Scallops and Heart of Palm Vegan Crab Cakes are festive and unique, and best of all — no one was harmed in the process.

  

King Trumpet Vegan Scallops
Serves 6

5-6 king trumpet mushrooms
1 cup veggie broth
½ cup nori or dry seaweed
1 teaspoon minced garlic
Sea salt
Black pepper

1. Mix the veggie broth with the seaweed and garlic in a bowl, and set aside.
2. Chop the mushroom stems into 1” thick pieces (I can usually get 4-5 pieces per mushroom.)
3. Set mushroom pieces in a deep dish or baking pan and pour the veggie broth mixture over them. Let stand for 20-30 minutes.
4. Heat a sauté pan on medium heat, and add 1 tablespoon of sunflower oil or any vegetable oil you have on hand.
5. Place mushrooms neatly into the pan and sear on both sides for 5-8 minutes total.
6. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.

Serve with sautéed spinach or fresh greens.

If you want to make this a raw dish, soak mushrooms in 2 cups filtered water, 1 large piece of kombu, 1 teaspoon sea salt, 2 teaspoon minced garlic for 3 hours. Then serve over baby arugula or any of your favorite greens.

Heart of Palm Vegan Crab Cakes
Makes about 24 patties

1- 15 ounce can drained chickpea (keep liquid)
2-15 ounce can heart of palm
¼ cup vegan mayo
Juice of 1 lemon or 1 tablespoon
3 tablespoon chickpea liquid
1 teaspoon tamari
⅓ cup scallions minced
2 cup bread crumbs plus 2 cups breadcrumbs for breading the cake cakes
2 teaspoon spicy mustard
2 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
1 sheet of nori or ½ cup of salted seaweed snack
1 teaspoon minced garlic or garlic powder
1 teaspoon salt (adjust to taste)
2 teaspoon dried or fresh parsley

For the breading and frying of the patties:
3 cups avocado oil for frying
1 cup plant based milk for breading only
1 cup flour for breading only

1. In a bowl, add the chickpeas and heart of palm. Hand mash until slightly chunky and smooth, and set aside.
2. In a mixing bowl, whisk the chickpea liquid until slightly foamy. Then add vegan mayo, lemon juice, tamari, mustard, and all of the herbs and spices. Mix well.
3. Combine the chickpeas and heart of palm mash with the chickpea liquid mix, along with the 2 cups of breadcrumbs, and the scallions into the mixing bowl.
4. Set mixture in the freezer to set for 20-30 minutes.
5. Create a flouring station: 1 cup any plant based milk, 1 cup flour, 2 cups bread crumbs.
6. Remove mixture from freezer, lay parchment paper on a baking sheet and start to bread. Make 3 ounce circle-shaped cakes, dip in the milk, then dip in the flour, then dip in the breadcrumbs until completely covered. Set aside.
7. Heat up frying oil in any 3″ deep pan. Test with a drop of water or piece of bread to make sure oil is ready for frying. (You will know it is ready to fry when it sizzles and bubbles with the test ingredient.)
8. Then submerge 3-4 patties at a time, and fry for 3 minutes until golden brown.
9. Let cool on unwaxed parchment paper for 2 minutes, then serve.

For garnish, or to use as dip: Blend ½ cup dill, 1 clove garlic, 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast, and 2 cups mayo until smooth.

If you would like to get to know a turkey in real life, volunteer at your local sanctuary. We recommend signing up to clean a turkey barn! You can also sponsor a rescued turkey. 

In the age of fake news, corporate propaganda and repression of dissent, bringing truth to the public has become a democratic obligation. Something that none of us can afford to ignore is the plight of animals exploited for human benefit. Not only is the suffering inflicted on them deeply immoral, but the human-animal binary relegates fellow humans to inferior status. (The Trump administration’s use of the word “animals” in vilifying migrant populations is just one example.) The anti-oppression work being created by conscientious people has become a beacon of hope for our society. And this is why the new documentary Dominion is so important.

The animal agriculture industry — which makes up the largest segment of agriculture in the U.S. — is one of the most violent and secretive institutions on the planet. Its trillion dollar profits are sustained by the public’s ignorance, and it goes to great lengths to maintain the status quo. In 2015, following the release of his first documentary Lucent, which exposed Australia’s pig industry, filmmaker and activist Chris Delforce (who wrote, co-produced, directed and edited Dominion) had his home raided by a police task force, leading to Australia’s first-ever ag gag case.

Chris Delforce Dominion Animal Rights Film Director

Chris Delforce, the director of “Dominion,” at the Dominion Animal Rights March in Melbourne on April 28. (Photo: Bree Gaudette.)

Undeterred, Delforce and his team of investigators continued gathering evidence of the systemic brutality endured by animals. The resulting Dominion, comprised of several hundred hours of footage obtained by drones and hidden and handheld cameras, focuses on six main areas of exploitation: food, fashion, entertainment, wildlife, pets and experimentation. In an unflinching account, the film emphasizes the ingrained agony of global practices that are legal and deemed “humane.” Accompanying the visuals are narrations from a number of well-known vegans, whose involvement was facilitated by Earthlings’ creator Shaun Monson, now co-producer of Dominion. Actors Joaquin Phoenix and Rooney Mara joined the film earlier this year, and just announced was Kat Von D – LAIKA’s Issue Six cover star  – as well as musician Sia and Stranger Things‘ actress Sadie Sink.

What makes Dominion, which is in the midst of an international tour with screenings coming up in New York and Los Angeles, especially unique is that it’s more than a film. It’s part of a wide-reaching initiative that includes the online database Aussie Farms Repository and the coordinated activism campaign Dominion Movement. The recent Dominion Animal Rights March in Melbourne drew over 3,000 demonstrators. With Dominion, we hoped to unite activists with a common goal, moving beyond fragmentation to become a solid, unstoppable movement,” Chris Delforce tells LAIKA. Here, Delforce shares with us more candid insights on the film’s process, overcoming adversity and galvanizing others to action.


LAIKA: Was the Dominion Movement part of your vision from the beginning, or did it take shape as film production progressed? Why was it so important for you to pair the film with on the ground activism?

Chris Delforce: We knew this was a film that was going to inspire and anger people. There’s sometimes a suggestion that by targeting vegans as one of our primary audiences we’re just preaching to the converted, but we see turning vegans into activists just as important, if not more so, than turning non-vegans into vegans. We’ve always hoped that Dominion would be a powerful catalyst, a tool that activists can use in their own creative ways. The lockdown and protest at a Melbourne slaughterhouse just prior to the film’s premiere is an example. That action continues a steadily increasing trend over the last couple of years in Australia. Video outreach in the streets, protests and lockdowns at animal exploitation facilities, marches and demonstrations, all of it has been ramped up, and we hope Dominion’s release will push it all to the next level. 

dominion animal rights protest

Over 40 activists participate in a slaughterhouse shutdown in Benalla, Victoria on March 26 to coincide with the film’s Melbourne premiere. (Photo courtesy of Dominion Movement.)

L: The Dominion March must’ve been electrifying. Was there a sense of turning a corner in the movement, of imminent change on the horizon?

CD: The Dominion March was an incredible night. It truly exemplified how much this movement has grown, and I think was a clear signal of what’s to come. Prior to this, the largest animal rights march in Australia had around 800-900 in attendance. I’ve heard so much positive feedback from participants — more and more people are getting motivated to do everything they can and are realizing that they’re not alone. We hired a large tri-screen truck to play footage from the film as we marched and during the speeches, along with dozens of participants holding TV screens, tablets and laptops showing the same material. What that footage shows has been kept secret for so long, so taking over the Melbourne central business district with it was invigorating.

“Even if there was a magical method of raising and slaughtering animals that was entirely free of pain, fear and suffering, it still could never be ethical.”

L: Dominion’s mission makes it clear that “it’s not a question of better ways of doing the wrong thing,” as Rooney Mara says in her narration towards the end of the film. Do you consider yourself an abolitionist?

CD: I do. At some point it became abundantly clear to me that “welfare” reforms are nothing more than marketing slogans. Free range, ethically farmed, humanely slaughtered, sow stall free, local… These are just buzzwords designed to make consumers feel better about paying for the violent, unnecessary deaths of thinking, feeling beings who desperately wanted to live. Even if there was a magical method of raising and slaughtering animals that was entirely free of pain, fear and suffering, it still could never be ethical. Would it be ethical if they were human? Our history is plagued with atrocities committed under justification of self-declared superiority. Martin Luther King Jr’s plea for a “revolution of values” remains as relevant and urgent as ever. The fact that we can breed, confine, exploit and kill other beings is a very different thing to us having the moral right to do so.

Very few people, though, are persuaded by – or even open to hearing – philosophical arguments alone. I believe that [showing] the inherently barbaric nature of these industries is a much more efficient motivator. It helps people understand the individual suffering behind the neatly packaged products on supermarket shelves. I think there’s definitely a place for strategic campaigns that garner huge media attention, such as [banning] battery cages and live export, without advocating “lesser evil” alternatives. Because when people can connect with, and understand, that particular suffering, they’re more ready to face the question of why other types of suffering are any more excusable.

Pig Transport Slaughter Animal Rights Activist

An activist connects with a pig bound for slaughter at a vigil at Diamond Valley Pork in Australia. (Photo: Bear Witness Australia.)

L: Were you especially conscious of underscoring with Dominion that these are not instances of cruelty, but industry norms?

CD: These industries have a few basic lines that they recycle, regardless whether it makes any sense. “Isolated incidents,” “rogue operator who doesn’t represent our industry,” “one or two bad workers who have been sacked or retrained,” etc. Dominion follows Lucent’s lead in focusing on recurring, standard, legal industry practices — things that can generally be found with just a little digging into their own documentation that they publish for their farmers, and in the codes of practice that govern the kinds of horrible things they can do that would otherwise be illegal under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act. Dominion even uses some of the industry’s own “educational” footage. Failing to overtly counter their typical responses would be a disservice to the animals who suffer at their hands every day, so I’ve taken great care with Dominion to emphasize the scale and regularity of what is being shown.

L: What were some of the practices marketed as “humane” that you saw time and time again as being anything but?

CD: Gas chambers were being proclaimed without scrutiny, or evidence, as a “high welfare/humane” method of stunning pigs for over 20 years. The footage we’ve obtained from five of these facilities, including the largest in the southern hemisphere, clearly shows that every pig who enters those chambers screams and thrashes in agony until they finally pass out.

Very little attention is paid to fish – there still seems to be a prevalent belief that they don’t feel pain, despite clear scientific evidence to the contrary. I’m so glad we were able to capture their “humane slaughter,” which in reality is a slow [death through] freezing over half an hour or [through] suffocation.

[Seeing] broiler (meat) chickens and turkeys struggling to stand or walk because they’ve been bred to grow so fast and so large that their legs can’t support their weight. Ducks having their throats cut while fully conscious because they’ve lifted their heads over the electric stun bath. I picked 3 or 4 incidents to use in the film out of dozens and dozens, captured on a single camera on a random workday.

Sheep, pigs and calves [being] jabbed in the head over and over with the electric stunner prongs, growing increasingly terrified with each failed attempt. Once or twice a day at a particular facility, sheep would manage to jump out of the knock box and run around the kill floor among hanging bodies in various stages of dismemberment.

Broiler Chicken Dominion Film

A chicken raised for meat production, known as a “broiler,” is disabled by its own unnatural weight. (Photo: Animal Liberation.)

L: How were you impacted the ordeal of having your home raided and the subsequent charges leveled against you?

CD: There have been a few pivotal moments in my seven years as an activist that very nearly broke me. Looking back, I credit them with making me so much stronger, more determined and resilient. The raid was definitely the most significant. I responded initially by making “Thousand Eyes,” a 4 minute edit of Lucent inspired by my anger, frustration and sadness, which has since been used for street outreach all over Australia and the world. A few months after [the raid], I was hit with the first round of charges, and I responded to that by announcing Dominion and launching a crowdfunding campaign for it. Those initial charges were dropped in favor of the “ag gag” charges under an existing Surveillance Devices law — for filming and publishing footage from inside pig farms and slaughterhouses. The law itself was a perfectly legitimate and necessary one focusing on matters of personal privacy, established in 2007 to replace the outdated Listening Devices Act. But this was the first time it had been used to protect commercial interests and send a message to activists.

After two years of minor court hearings, a three-day trial was finally set in August 2017. All charges were dismissed just one hour into the trial, as police were unable to prove that they’d obtained the proper written authority to lay the charges in the first place. The magistrate commented on the “incompetence” of the police and the clearly political nature of the case. [The experience] taught us [activists] a lot about police procedures and the types of evidence they can and do use, including phone and bank records, file metadata from seized hard drives and photos downloaded from our websites. Of course I’m expecting to be raided again in retaliation someday, but I’ve come to accept it’s just an unfortunate inevitability of trying to make the world a better place, and I know that I’ll be able to recover from it as I have before.

L: The footage is obviously the crux of Dominion, but the narration is also extremely important. What was the process behind it?

CD: I researched and wrote most of the script over an intense two weeks, after roughly 80% of the footage had been obtained, though in some sections I was able to rely on previous research by other individuals who had contributed to the Knowledgebase on our Repository website. I delayed writing the introduction and conclusion until after I’d edited the rest of the film together, knowing that I wouldn’t be in the right place mentally to properly put my thoughts and feelings into words until I’d sat through all of that footage. I then wrote the conclusion overnight while playing the London Grammar album “Truth is a Beautiful Thing” on repeat. A few days later we went out to Edgar’s Mission sanctuary to film the rescued animals for [the conclusion], and then finally I wrote and edited the introduction, which was probably the most difficult. Shaun and I recorded Joaquin and Rooney in the living room of their Los Angeles home, Joaquin first. Both were visibly and audibly distressed throughout the process depending on what they were describing, and with Joaquin in particular we needed to take a few breaks given the very heavy content. Dominion’s conclusion especially owes much of its power to their raw, genuine readings of it; you can really hear the emotion and sincerity in their voices.

Sheep Slaughter Saleyard Australia

Sheep crowded in a holding pen at Victorian Livestock Exchange in Pakenham, being sold for meat. (Photo: Unconsciouly Cruel.)

L: What was it like to team up with the creator of Earthlings, a film that had such an impact on your life?

CD: I’d been a huge admirer of Shaun’s work for several years; to have him agree to put his name on a film I’d written and edited, a film our small team had worked so hard on, was a very proud moment and a real feeling of validation. Before we started speaking with him, I’d been worried that he might feel some sort of resentment towards someone trying to enter his “space” in the movement, but that turned out to be the farthest from the truth. I’ve always been a proponent of activists and organizations working together.

L: Impressively, there is a self-care section on the film’s site. Why did you feel it was especially needed now, with the release of Dominion??

CD: Dominion was never meant to break or depress anyone — it was meant to empower and motivate. We want people to get active, not just for a short while, but for the long haul. Self-care is absolutely vital to keep us from burning out. A burnt-out activist is of no use to the animals.

L: Dominion shows animals being liberated from these harrowing places. Was there an intentional message to activists in including that kind of footage?

CD: There were a few motives for the end-credit scenes. We wanted to end the film on a hopeful, positive note, but also reinforce that this footage was obtained by real, ordinary humans, and that all of the suffering was real too. As these industries become more and more transparent through films like this, through other tools like our Repository website, and through more people going out to farms and slaughterhouses and sharing their experiences online, it’s inevitable that rescues will only continue to increase. Ultimately we can’t shut down these industries just through individual rescues, but with care and strategy, liberation is and should always be an important part of the movement. What I see as an inevitable step towards the end of animal abuse industries is an environment where every single one of the facilities is fair game. Their name, location, and what they do, publicly available for anyone to see, any of them potentially the next to be showcased on social media or in the news. If homes aren’t available for rescues, open investigations would still be very beneficial, I believe. 

Battery Cage Chicken Animal Liberation

A hen used for egg production is rescued from a battery cage. (Photo: Bear Witness Australia.)

L: What are some of the logistics in running a complex project like the Aussie Farms Repository and your plans for it?

CD: Australia is a proof of concept. I want to show that [the Repository] is a valuable and effective tool, so that when the time comes to expand worldwide, it already has a reputation and extensive demonstration of its capabilities. At the moment, the uploads are from a fairly limited number of users, with much of the material coming from already-released investigations available on our other websites (aussiepigs.com and aussieturkeys.com), though gradually more individuals are starting to upload their own content. I hope to get it to a stage where activists and organizations who conduct investigations upload their material to it, to essentially become a cross between Wikipedia, WikiLeaks and Youtube, covering the entirety of animal exploitation industries and serving as the first stop for anyone who wants to learn or to educate others.

L: I imagine that Dominion Movement has attracted some remarkable participants. Are there any personal stories that stick out for you? 

CD: Dominion’s Assistant Director, and the Operations Director of Aussie Farms, Lissy Jayne has been an integral member of our team for the last four years and has never wanted any credit, but recently has been gaining overdue recognition. The iconic calf on the Dominion poster was photographed by Lissy during an investigation. A lot of the photos used in our campaigns were captured by her, and many have been released through her own organization Bear Witness Australia. During the Dominion March, she stood on stage holding up prints of some of the individual animals she’s encountered during investigations, while a speech written by her was read out by Apoorva Madan, the vegan psychologist who wrote the self-care material on the [Dominion] site. Lissy has been heavily involved in our investigations, campaigns and actions and is now taking on more speaking roles to give much-needed female representation in a male-dominated movement.

“The truth can be not just an incredibly powerful tool, but sometimes all that is needed to put an end to a horrible injustice that has gone unchallenged for decades.”

L: You’ve witnessed a great deal over the years, but is there any one specific experience that was a major catalyst in cultivating your present-day drive?

CD: The first pig farm I ever went to will always stay with me. Until then we’d mainly been doing rescues, but it became clear to me at that point that our priority needed to shift to investigations. When I walked out of the farrowing shed, I turned to the person who had come with me and said that we were going to shut it down, and we did, not through the authorities who did lay charges against the piggery but later dropped them, but through the relentless public pressure that came as a result of putting the footage and photos out into the world. The experience showed me that information — the truth — can be not just an incredibly powerful tool, but sometimes all that is needed to put an end to a horrible injustice that had gone unchallenged for decades.

by Julie Gueraseva

Top photo by Lissy Jayne of a calf bound for slaughter, courtesy of Dominion Movement.


LAIKA’s mission is to bring you authentic, well-rounded and accurate reporting on vegan culture and activism. We’re so grateful to have readers like you. Even a small donation will help our cause and keep LAIKA strong, so it can continue to inspire and inform. Thank you for supporting us with Patreon.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

San Francisco is done with fur

coyote fur

Rescued coyote — an animal killed for fur trim on Canada Goose jackets — at California’s Lockwood Animal Rescue Center (Jennifer MaHarry/LAIKA)

On the heels of Donatella Versace’s headline-making announcement that she is “out” of fur, comes another huge development in the global fight against the fur trade. In a historic move, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved on Tuesday a citywide ban on fur sales in a 10-0 vote. “Profiting off of the literal backs of animals is not right and we will no longer tolerate animal cruelty in the city of St. Francis!” said SF District Supervisor Katy Tang today, who first put forward the ban proposal in December of last year.

San Francisco District Supervisor Katy Tang on the steps of City Hall, following the ban approval (Kitty Tang/Facebook)

The ban will go into effect on January 1, 2019 and will apply to the sale, display and manufacturing of new fur garments, as well as online purchases for delivery to San Francisco addresses. Multiple animal rights organizations supported Tang in her efforts, including Direct Action Everywhere, Animal Legal Fund, PETA and Humane Society International. “The fur trade is responsible for the suffering and death of more than 100 million animals a year. Today, San Francisco has said a resounding ‘no’ to that suffering,” said HSI’s CEO Kitty Block in a statement. San Francisco joins West Hollywood and Berkeley in California, Sao Paulo in Brazil, and India in adopting similar bans, but is the largest U.S. city to go fur-free.

The San Francisco ban reflects a growing momentum; the past year has seen a passionate global resurgence in anti-fur activism — ranging from high profile campaigns by international coalitions to local grassroots efforts. Mark Glover, director of the UK-based organization Respect for Animals, where fur farming has been banned since 2000, told LAIKA last year that “the fur trade will end, as did, for the most part, commercial whaling, but its demise will be consumer led.” With the likes of Gucci, Hugo Boss, Armani, Furla, Michael Kors, Jimmy Choo and the afore-mentioned Versace all dropping fur in recent months — the end is appears to be in sight.