Emily-Deschanel

WE ARE THRILLED TO ANNOUNCE THE ARRIVAL OF OUR FOURTH ISSUE! This, “The Future Issue” is dedicated to the people, innovations, and activism that is propelling our society into a better tomorrow — today. Gracing the cover is the stunning Emily Deschanel — the talented and versatile star of the hit show Bones, a passionate animal advocate, and a vegan of over two decades. The captivating and humble actress opens up to LAIKA in an exclusive and inspiring profile, giving us an inside look into her life, taking us behind the scenes of Bones, shedding light on her craft, and sharing how she channels her creativity into making a positive impact on everyone around her.

Emily Deschanel vegan

We bring together personal insights from some of veganism’s brightest minds in a first-of-its kind feature, “The Futurists,” which includes the likes of Sam Simon, Russell Simmons and Jill Robinson. With equal attention and dignity we give to our human subjects, we tell the stories of animals – tackling difficult topics head on. Like the 12 page photo essay “The Will To Live,” which through resonating photography and personal accounts from devoted activists, explores the depth of animal sentience – and advances us to a better understanding. We spend time at home with the iconic Esther The Wonder Pig, who has become an ambassador for her kind, in “Moment.” We celebrate the bounty of our planet with delicious, colorful dishes in “Mexican Feast,” and beautiful fruits and vegetables in “Taste Notes.”

Morgan Bogle

Lauren Toyota

We profile bold vegan female entrepreneurs in “She’s The Boss,” and turn the mic on rising star and MTV Canada host Lauren Toyota who is raising her voice for animals in the media. We get to know leading chef Bryant Terry closer, and find out what makes his brand of vegan cuisine at once a throwback to simpler times and an exciting glimpse into the future. As usual, we have vibrant travel stories, like an in-depth food tour of Paris, with a spotlight on local cutting-edge activism.

3_2

5_2

We bring you brilliant essays, like the provocative “Animating Journalism” from James McWilliams and Vickery Eckhoff. And of course, we showcase innovative vegan beauty and fashion— all gorgeously photographed by some of today’s top talent.

6_3

Each page asserts the breadth and timeliness of the vegan and animal rights movement, and celebrates the forward-thinkers who are setting the pace. With every story, we reinforce the LAIKA credo: that one can live a fulfilling life without ever harming another. It is a joy and honor to have you, dear reader, along for this ride! We are so excited to share our Fourth Issue with you. Subscribe and get your copy HERE!

Cover and Isn’t She Lovely feature photographed by Andrew Stiles • Cover story written by Stacy Gueraseva She’s The Boss photographed by Balarama Heller Living Loud photographed by Joel Barhamand Will To Live photographed by Mike Hrinewski The Futurists illustrated by Sophie Lucido Johnson Mexican Feast photographed by Edgar Molina

1

SOMETHING EXTRAORDINARY IS HAPPENING AT THIS VERY MOMENT IN THE NETHERLANDS. There is a political party with two seats in the Dutch parliament. But it’s not what one might expect… Their agenda? To end the treatment of animals as economic product, to abolish factory farming, and to achieve a better society. The party is the Dutch Party for the Animals (PvdD), and it’s led by Marianne Thieme. Since co-founding it in 2002, she has spearheaded unprecedented breakthroughs— from the enforcement of stricter video monitoring in slaughterhouses to securing public funding for the development of meat substitutes. The party won two seats in parliament in 2006, after four years of campaigning. Not only have they influenced the other political parties in the Dutch parliament to become more animal-friendly, but their success has inspired the formation of 13 more animal parties around the world, including the United States. In December 2013, all of the parties came together at an international symposium in Istanbul, Turkey called Animal Politics: Theory and Practice. Organized by the Dutch Party for the Animals, the symposium covered everything from the philosophies of animal rights to how activists can establish a party for the animals in their country. In 2008, Marianne was featured as a presenter in the documentary documentary Meat The Truth— a sort of retort to Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth. (“Al Gore forgot something very important,” she explains. “He left out factory farming, and we felt it was necessary make the addendum to that.”) She is a no less than a visionary— with her mind firmly planted in the present, and her heart always dreaming up a better future. An extremely effective problem-solver, whose strategies have yielded tangible results, she is also a resolute optimist who believes that within the next fifty years humankind’s treatment of animals will change dramatically. We had the chance to have an enlightening conversation with her by phone at The Hague earlier this week.

At the recent symposium in Istanbul, it must have been amazing to be in the company of the various animal rights parties that you helped inspire. What did you discover about all of your commonalities?
People from all over Europe mostly, but also from America, and Canada came to talk about animal politics. We met people from the Turkish Party for the Animals, we met people from Cyprus to start a Party for the Animals. We continue to be in very close contact with the Party for the Animals in Portugal and Spain. We had members from the Swedish animal rights party visit us in the Hague in Holland just the other day. The Portuguese, the Spanish and the Swedish Party for the Animals will join the European elections the 22nd of May.

The exciting thing is that we not only have a shared view on animal rights, but also a shared view on how the system of society, the economical system, should be changed in order to protect the things that really matter, or the beings that really matter. For example, we share the same view on economical growth— that economical growth is a problem, instead of a solution because we have limited commodities on the planet. The planet can provide enough for everybody’s need, but not for everybody’s greed. It’s more than just animal rights.

 

So how do we tackle this issue of limited commodities when ultimately of course we want the vegan economy to grow in order to replace the animal product-based economy?
Well, that’s of course a development that we should encourage, but that’s a development within the limits of the planet. And I think the economical system must be limited by what the planet can provide for everybody. So that will be the boundaries for development, and within these boundaries there is of course room for development— for sustainable development and for business that is sustainable and is not only focused on profit, but also focused on personal growth and healthcare for everybody, and also food for everybody within the growing population on this planet.

 

You had mentioned once that initially people thought the Party for the Animals was a joke, but then not long after, intellectuals started joining it. Has your multi-issue platform played a role in this?
Of course there still are people that think it’s something that you can’t take very seriously. But more and more people are getting used to the fact that there is for the first time ever in the world a party for non-humans. Every social justice movement has to deal with this phase of first getting ignored, then ridiculed and even criminalized, but in the end they win. That’s what Ghandi said, and he’s so right—it’s just like that. Every time when we start a new initiative as a party for the animals in the national parliament— we go through these phases again: ignor[ed], ridicule[ed], etc. But what we see now is that as we are becoming more and more mainstream, people are really starting to appreciate what we do. And that’s also because not only animal-caring people vote for the Party for the Animals, but also people who really got to know us through our other standpoints. For example, the viewpoints about economic growth. Then they realize, “Oh now I understand why you make such a fuss of the animal rights issue” — it has everything to do with suppression, everything to do also with my own life, we are victims of the multinationals, of the free market. We try to make the barrier for people a little bit lower by starting to make close connections with other issues in society.

 

Some of your accomplishments have included enforcement of stricter video monitoring of animals in slaughterhouses and live markets, as well as securing €6m ($8m) of public money to find alternatives to meat. Those are unprecedented victories. How has the government been cooperating, and how have these developments affected the other parties in the parliament?
Yes, we did get a majority to make an obligation for slaughterhouses. But what you see is that the government really tries to interpret this demand of the national parliament into “well, let’s ‘stimulate’ the slaughterhouses to do video observance.” So of course this is one of our successes, but what we still have to do is to get the government to do [exactly] what we want, and to do what the national parliament wants. And that’s a big challenge. But on the other hand, we got a six million euro budget every year for innovations on meat substitutes. But just to let you know that the government always tries to get meat substitutes for example, insects as a meat substitute! Then we have to start a debate again in the parliament, “That’s not what we want. We want plant-based substitutes.” And that’s our continuing fight, but it works a lot because we inspire bigger political parties in our parliament as well. And they want to become more animal-friendly, because they want to earn their seats back. So that’s exactly what we want— we act as a pacer in the marathon. And get the other political parties to “run faster,” to work harder for animal-friendly measures, like meat substitutes.

 

Another big breakthrough came was when the majority of the parliament agreed with you to outlaw the slaughter of animals without stunning. What was that process like?
When we started this in 2008, people said to me, “You will never get this new bill passed in parliament.” But because we are so open, and because there’s no question about our integrity, and  we do this because of the suffering of animals and not because we are xenophobic, or against Jews or Muslims, people started to believe that we did have scientific proof that a slaughter without stunning is really something that is not of this time any longer. We do respect religious freedom, but not when it comes to human or animal suffering. We draw the line there. And we heard from the people in our parliament, “We could never start up this bill, because we would be criticized that we are against Muslims or Jews. But you could, because we know why you do this.” It’s very pure. And that’s why we got 116 out of 150 votes for this bill. Unfortunately, we didn’t pass this bill in the senate, because the religious lobby groups were more vigilant in this phase. They had underestimated our influence in national parliament, so when we went to the senate, they armed themselves more. That’s why the senate with more old fashioned, older people didn’t want to accept this bill, but we will come back when we have a new senate next year.

 

So as a political party, you now have a noticeable level of influence over the other parties?
That’s the difference between a non-governmental organization (NGO) and having an animal rights party in parliament— an animal rights party is a threat for political parties. You hear from politicians, “I always get an harassed by the NGOs. I really am fed up with these NGOs who always want to talk with me, and I don’t want to listen to them.” But when you are in parliament as an animal rights party, they have to listen to you all the time, in every debate we participate in. And what you see is that they adopt our views now, and they tell the people in the street, “Well, you know, we are the party for the animals, we are also very animal friendly.” So that’s very nice to see.

And for example, we’ve got a yearly debate on the budget for agriculture and fisheries. And normally, the subject of the debate was always about earning money for the farmers and for the fishermen. And now, 80% of the debate is about animal rights and animal welfare. That has everything to do with the competition other parties feel by having a Party for the Animals in the parliament.

 

How does it feel to be able to directly address your country’s parliament on issues of animal rights?
We’ve got 150 people in parliament and the Party for the Animals are with just two people. There’s 9 parties in our country that vary from liberals, to labor parties, to Christian democrats, to very conservative Christian parties, and so on. Every time I have to make a speech, I know that 148 people are not waiting for me to speak, they do not want to hear. But I know that there are more and more people outside of parliament who are really happy with the fact that I am there. When I have to speak, I think of all those people outside of the parliament who want me to be there. It’s such an opportunity to talk for ten or twenty minutes about animal suffering in factory farms or animal experimentation. They really have to listen to all the experiments that I talk about, all the things that are happening to animals in the slaughterhouse. I can really tell about how a cow is being slaughtered. That has never been done before. Then I can ask questions to the state secretary of the government or administer of the government, “What do you think about this?” and “Are you going to ban this?” and “Why not?” They really have to get into this issue, they cannot neglect or ignore it. During a debate, another party stands up and does their speech and they are moved by what we have been saying. They feel obliged to react and come back with a response. Because we talk about the suffering, we move the politicians personally. These politicians always think about, “How can I gain power?”, “How can I get my motion, my initiative, my bill through the parliament, how can I get the majority?” And now the debate is not all about that anymore, it’s about personal choices.

 

This must’ve been an eye-opening and inspiring experience to see how people can be affected. And that if you can affect a politician in this way, imagine how you can affect the average person on the street.
Political action is a great instrument to better the lives of animals. But the really big achievements, the really big changes you can make is by inspiring the person in front of you. If you can change their heart, I think that’s the biggest achievement you can have. We always have a lot of politicians in our parliament who really mock us, who really are fed up with us, who try to destabilize us by doing ‘mooing’ during our speech or doing things like that, or they leave the room. But all these emotions of anger and sarcasm or hope are needed to move people, to have a real change. If you don’t get these emotions of anger, then you can’t change anything. It’s also encouraging to have all these strong emotions.

 

And so what insights have you gained about being an effective advocate on a personal level?
People always want to join other people who are optimistic, in sort of a winning mood, or with a lot of self-esteem, and a lot of humor. Humor has the capacity to offer self-reflection, an opportunity to laugh at yourself. I think if you’re too serious, and too much like a priest, and you’re like, “You’re wrong, and I’m right”— then people will close their hearts. If you are living the change you want to see in other people, you can let people see that you can still be an enjoyable person, and have an enjoyable life with a lot of laughter and fun, then people want to join you. It doesn’t mean that you have to be dishonest about suffering. You can stick to your ideas. The way you sell it that makes the difference.

 

It’s almost about “marketing” it the right way…
Market, yeah! And for example my husband, [the Vegetarian Butcher ] is a plant-based farmer, and that’s how he sells his vegan product. And it works!  It’s about enjoying life, and being a good person at the same time. And some of his customers are people who don’t want to become vegetarian in one day, but consider themselves “meat-leavers”— is what we call it here in our country.

 

“Meat-leavers”— I love that! And the demand for his product has really grown very quickly, from what I’ve read. Combined with you securing public funding for meat substitutes, does it feel that big changes are unfolding?
At the same time it’s a country of cheese, and milk and meat. It’s one of the biggest exporters of agricultural livestock product. But still— the people in our country are really fed up with this factory farming system. This is the growing counterforce, the growing minority who say, “Stop this. This is not what we want. We want our lives more animal friendly.” It’s in the air. It’s bigger than us.

When you look at, for example, the genetic engineering of animals and all the new ways of using or mistreating animals are being developed, you sometimes get really depressed. But at the same time, although the government and the large multinationals want us to believe that large kill solutions are the future— the people do not believe that anymore. The change will be bottom up, instead of coming from governmental institutions. And this bottom up solution is caused by the people who do not trust politicians any longer and feel— literally feel— when you look at the climate change, for example, what it means to just do “business as usual.” So that’s where I gain my optimism.

 

And with these changing tides, comes a real opportunity to get through to people on multiple levels.
You have to be rational and emotional at the same time. Rational with facts and figures, and emotional to show people that you care.

We’ve got so many different arguments to persuade people to cut down their meat consumption. It can be human health, animal welfare or animal rights. It can be environment. It can be solidarity with people around the world who produce animal feed while they are starving. It can be the disappearance of nature and the biodiversity loss. When you’ve got a person in front of you and you ask them, “What are your views?,” “What’s in your heart?,” “Which issues are you most concerned with: is it the poverty in the world? or is it the climate change? or animals?” When you hear a person talk about poverty in the world, you’ve got an angle. You’ve got an opportunity to talk about land grabbing in Brazil, because animal feed companies want to have the land for animal feed. There’s always an opportunity. It’s such a luxury.

 

So are you feeling hopeful that globally we are on the verge of something major?
There is a professor of animal ethics and legislation here in Holland who predicts that within 50 years, people will feel ashamed of what we did to the animals. More like a common shame, and not only the shame that conscious people feel, but also more like it’s a common ground, a common standpoint— that what we did in these years, and the years before, in the last century, is really something we should be ashamed of. And he predicts it will be in less than 50 years, and I have that same feeling. It’s what we call the zeitgeist. It’s something in the air. It also has to do with the fact that we realize finally after all these crises, like the food crisis, the biodiversity crisis, the economical crisis— that we cannot eat money and build our society on things that really do not exist, you know what I mean? The financial crisis, the belief that we can make money out of money for this artificial world in which we believe prosperity could grow for everybody— we realize that it was all a big lie. And I think that because this realization is with a lot of people, the crisis can be the turning point of saying goodbye to the man-centered way of thinking. A crisis always means misfortune and suffering and of course that’s the case, but it’s also a good opportunity for an awakening, for an ethical awakening. I think that we’re on the threshold of a new era.

For more information, visit: Party for the Animals

Introduction and interview by Julie Gueraseva

photo courtesy of Party for the Animals

Bill de Blasio at a rally to save NYC’s hospitals with his partner Chirlane to his right.

Editor’s Note: Due to Mayor de Blasio’s failure to protect NYC’s carriage horses and pass a ban on horse-drawn carriages, this story’s praise of him categorically no longer reflects our opinion of him.

THIS YEAR’S ELECTION MARKS A CRITICAL JUNCTURE FOR ANIMALS IN NEW YORK CITY, on the verge of either bursting through a glass ceiling or being relegated to the basement for another 4, 8, maybe 12 years. Bill de Blasio has recently experienced a surge in the polling for NYC Mayor. In fact, he is tied for first place with Christine Quinn. For animal advocates that is welcomed news, not only because of how disastrous Quinn has been, but because de Blasio has whole-heartedly embraced the need for a more humane city. Mahatma Gandhi once observed that “the greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” We now have a candidate for the Mayor of New York City who understands the significance of such a statement, and holds the promise of a greater city. As a Public Advocate, de Blasio has been supportive of animal welfare reforms, and he is the only candidate running who has devoted a section of their platform to the humane treatment of animals. In his campaign for mayor, deBlasio calls for an end to the inhumane and exploitative treatment of carriage horses. He also calls for the regulation of stores that sell puppy-mill dogs, and seeks to improve AC&C (Animal, Care & Control). Furthermore, while a member of the City Council, deBlasio co-sponsored legislation which would ban exotic animals like elephants and lions from circuses in NYC. Both of de Blasio’s children, Dante and Chiara, are vegetarian— a decision they came to on their own.

Meanwhile, in the past 6 years as Speaker of the City Council, not only has Christine Quinn protected the inhumane and exploitative carriage horse industry, she has allowed Mayor Bloomberg to suffocate the AC&C (Animal, Care & Control) of funding. She has prevented votes on crucial legislation, with popular support among council members and constituents. Legislation such as allowing tenants the right to replace their companion animals when they die; and requiring sprinklers in pet stores after a series of fires killed several hundred animals. In fact, in 2009 the League of Humane Voters called Quinn “the biggest obstacle to more humane laws in NYC.”

It is incumbent on New York’s animal protection to community to ensure that Quinn does not become the next mayor of New York City. With three weeks to go until the Primary Election, now is the time to get involved in this year’s election. Legislation and policy which improve the lives of animals do not happen magically. They come as the result of effective activism and supportive leadership. In Bill de Blasio, we have found the kind of leadership that will help give NYC’s animals a better chance. And electing him as our next mayor will open the door for more change. — David Karopkin (law student and founder of GooseWatch NYC)

Please help support Bill de Blasio’s campaign by joining your fellow animal advocates at the Animal Advocates for Bill de Blasio cocktail reception on August 26th at the Peter Max Studio in Manhattan.

A supporter of Bill de Blasio.

We asked some of New York City’s animal advocates to sound off on the
upcoming elections:

“de Blasio seems genuinely to feel for people and to want to make the city a better place for all New Yorkers. On a range of quality-of-life issues, de Blasio authentically takes a stand, and he has shown [with his support of a carriage ban] that he isn’t afraid to stand up and be counted. That’s impressive. He is the progressive in this race. Meanwhile, Quinn masquerades as a progressive, despite her repeated betrayal of the public trust and a dismal human rights record that should be very concerning to us all. She’s completely disingenuous to tell voters that she has a strong record on animal welfare. Passing a couple of sham bills for political expediency—as Quinn has done—may fool a few people, but not NYC animal advocates who’ll be voting. Quinn killed the true shelter reform bill, and this city’s animals are suffering as a result.”
Mary Culpepper (writer and long-time member of the Coalition to Ban Horse-Drawn Carriages)

“Since becoming Speaker in 2006, Christine Quinn has not only blocked every meaningful animal protection bill introduced at City Hall, but, in an attempt to discredit her critics, she has also fast-tracked faux reform bills to portray herself as an advocate. NYC’s most vulnerable animals have waited for years for much needed legislative protections. For them, Quinn is the worst possible choice for Mayor. Bill de Blasio, however, has consistently spoken out about the importance of improving the lives of NYC’s most vulnerable animals, even though they can’t vote him. His understanding of the issues and his compassion for the “underdog” have distinguished him from the other candidates and have won him support from NYC’s animal advocacy community. By supporting a ban on horse-drawn carriages, a position that has earned him criticism in some circles, Mr. de Blasio has put principle ahead of politics.”
Donny Moss (documentary filmmaker and animal rights advocate)

“For the first time in 12 years, animal advocates have the opportunity to finally elect an animal friendly mayor. The Mayor’s office has so much control over how our city’s animals are treated – for instance, the mayor decides how much funding goes to city shelters, TNR programs for feral cats, funding for humane education for elementary school kids and the fate of NYC carriage horses. While we all may differ on some issues, we can all agree that Christine Quinn is not a friend to animals. For 8 years as Speaker of the City Council, she has systematically blocked every effort to pass common sense humane legislation such as putting life saving fire sprinklers in pet stores, build badly needed shelters in the Bronx and Queens, protecting a tenants’ right to have a pet and of course banning horse carriages.”
Allie Feldman (animal advocate and director of NYCLASS (New Yorkers for Clean, Livable and Safe Streets)

Learn more and get directly involved in helping the animals of NYC at:

+ NYCLASS

+ GooseWatch NYC

+ Coalition to Ban Horse-Drawn Carriages

Learn more about Bill de Blasio and his issues on his campaign site.

Photos by © David Katzenstein for New Yorkers for de Blasio



Save